Soap opera star Joan Collins defended aborting her unborn baby for the sake of her career Sunday in an interview with Piers Morgan’s Life Stories.

Collins, now in her 80s, said she had the abortion when she was 26 and engaged to fellow actor/director Warren Beatty, The Independent reports.

The British actress (“Dynasty,” “The Road to Hong Kong”) said she became pregnant just as her acting was starting to take off, and having a child “would have been the death of my career.”

“I had an abortion. It would have been the death of my career, and I was by then 26,” Collins told Morgan. “Of course I hesitated but I realized that if I was going to have a child I was going to be able to bring the child up properly and I believed very strongly that I’m in charge of my body.”

Collins had the abortion before England legalized abortions in 1967. Since then, she has been married five times and has three children, according to the report.

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She said she thought a child would have ruined her life, and she has no regrets.

“I was a feminist before the word was heard and I shall do what I felt was right for me. It would have been wrong to have done that. It would have ruined my life… it would have ruined my life,” Collins said.

Other celebrities have shared similar stories about aborting their unborn babies, claiming that their “right to choose” was one of the reasons for their success. Perhaps most notably was Michelle Williams’ speech at the Golden Globes in 2020. She urged women to act in their “own self-interest,” and thanked God for her “right to choose” abortion.

Contrary to what Williams and Collins claim, abortion does not empower women. It dehumanizes women and their unborn babies, treating both as less valuable simply because of who they are. It treats babies in the womb as disposable, even though they already are unique, living human beings from the moment of conception. And it treats women as weak, incapable of success unless they legally can kill their own unborn children. It treats a woman’s ability to nurture a child in the womb as a disease rather than a gift.

That is the opposite of empowering. Unborn babies deserve a right to life, and women deserve to be honored and encouraged when, planned or unplanned, they carry a child in their womb.

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